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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
that country and keep britain and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more including many civilians have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they were called to an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific you and mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many difficult times we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor, the prime minister told this house that some three quarters of this serious terrorist plots against britain linked afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its hea
of other countries and britain had to take on some of that and do it directly and do it very well. the town itself is going to be one of the first places in afghanistan to transition. is imminent already today that security is provided by afghans for afghans. having been there many times, i find that fact pretty staggering and encouraging and you should too. >> given that the raw material, high proportion of illegal drugs on britain streets starts in afghanistan at progress is being made in getting farmers to grow other things other than poppy and is the prime minister confident the afghan government will continue this work once we left? >> we are seeing progress on this. britain is invested in the wheat seed distribution project. one of the lessons of going to e country repeatedly in the last five years is if you want to doomething about poppy cultivation you can talk all you like about destroying crops. the real key is building roads because you have got to enable the afghans to get their produce toarket. if they don't have legitimate produce to get to legitimate market the drug dealers w
to bailing out greece. >> britain is not in the euro. while i am prime minister, it will never be. we should not be involved in the euro areas internal arrangements. only euro countries were involved in the first bailout. only eurozone countries have been in the discussion about further bailout. it is right not to use the e.u.- wide financial stability mechanism for future aid to greece. >> the worst outcome for the british economy from the greek crisis would be a disorderly and chaotic the of fault -- default and departure from the euro. what discussions have we had about preparing for that default which is inevitable? the president himself has said that it does not need to be disorderly to dissolve the without the currency's much destruction. >> what is causing disorder and the fact they're going bankrupt. nothing said in this chamber will alter that. if greece can neither withdraw or default, then good money via our money or the imf will be wasted bailing out greece. why not leave an orderly withdrawal of greece from the euro? >> is it time to dispose of these things? checks seem to have
on with doing things that britain should be doing in the world. whether that is trading with countries like nigeria or leading the aid effort in the horn of africa where we had been told is not just catastrophe, it is also a famine. >> mr. speaker, yesterday rupert murdoch was asked about his secret meetings with the prime minister and his government. he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. >> one of the outcomes is that there will be a lot more of leave everybody alone. >> in the investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personnel information transactions which were possibly identified as coming from 89 newspaper journalists. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the unlawful practices going on at mirror group newspapers? >> i think the gentleman makes an important point. what we should not believe automatically that these practices were spread right across the media, it would be naive to think they were restricted to one newspaper or one newspaper group. when you look at evidence, it is clear that they went wider.
will welcome it. alongside the important questions of behavior in britain's newsroom, the police, and the relationship between the politicians and press, there are a number of additional issues that need consideration. on the issue of media regulations, does he agree with me our instincts should continue to be for self-regulation? does he further agree that it needs to be prove that self-regulation can be made to work? and can he comment on the work going on privacy issues and whether he sees that as part of the investigation? can i welcome the decision to make cross media ownership part of the inquiry, does he agree with me more abuses of power are more likely to happen when there are high concentrations of power? can the inquiry be legislated for in the governments forthcoming communications act? can i suggest to him it would be wise to bring forward the act in the current date of 2015 which is when i believe it is planned for. finally on the protototo -- prol about transparency, back to the last general election. he will publish all of the details -- all of the details of the
the things that britain should be doing in the world, whether that is trading with countries like nigeria or south africa or leading the aid effort in the horn of africa where today we're told it's not a catastrophe or a trout and a famine and i'm proud britain is not being deconflicted on the great role it's doing in trying to feed hungry people. >> mr. speaker, yesterday these evidence sessions rupert murdoch was asked about his frequent meetings with the prime minister and his government to which he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. well, did prime minister and his government would reply without request? [laughter] >> one of the outcomes of all of this there will be a lot of people leaving alone. >> mr. speaker, in the operation motorman investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personal, 861 personal information transactions which were positively identified as coming from 89 mirror group newspaper journalists. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the unlawful practices going on at mirror group newspapers?
elaborate on that? >> in great britain they undertook of reform. they had a white paper and a study on what they should do. they concluded it would be useful to increase private savings at the same times so security reform. it actually increased benefits and the public system. but they decided that that was not enough. it was indexed at a lower rate. to really help people, we really needed to build the private pension savings. if you look at the private pension system, it covers fairly poorly most of the population. i have not quite updated it, but it says that for 75% of people that retire, social security and medicare is in excess of all of their private assets. we have a larger extent of the population dependent upon social security and medicare. how do we deal with it? one way we do what it is be -- we tried to increase some of those cash benefits for lower and moderate income people. from the middle-income people, i do not think we can get thereby adding to a system that is out of balance. we need to recognize that private retirement system is not doing a good job of covering the vast
. but internationally particularly. i note that in great britain, 30% of the assets in their financial system are held by insurance companies, not by financial institutions or banks, rather, but 15% in the united states. so both looking within the united states and looking internationally, your views are going to be extremely important and once again, i would hope that we'd move quickly to confirm you and get you on the fsoc. thank you for your service. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i thank all of you for being here and being willing to serve today the way you offered yourself and i thank your families for being here. i know it's -- you certainly will not receive many tough questions with all of these family members in the audience. so we're glad they're here and we're glad to see all of them. i'll start with you, mr. vice chairman, soon to be chairman, when dodd-frank was being debated and discussed, the previous chairman did an outstanding job of convincing the majority of members of the senate and the house to turn you into a super entity with orderly liquidation abilities. as we we
, britain, and if you constitutional monarchies in scandinavia, you have a rise of radicalism in continental europe through the depression and in hitler's germany, miscellany, and everywhere. when you have slow growth, you might think that everyone would say we should pitch in together and save the nation. it is not just here, but in both democracies. whenever these subgroups may become you want to hang on to what you have in a shrinking economy. it tends to over power politics and it is very frightening. >> there is the zero some mentality. do you want to add anything? >> it does not relate these days. we did not like one another when things were going good. that was because politics is not based on class groups but lifestyle groups. those sorts of relationships have broken. >> the lack of cohesion that i worry about is not a function of the economy as much as it is a function of demography. one might became a minority in the larger state of the union -- when whites became a minority, that forces us to recalculate what it means to be a member of a minority and what obligations and responsib
. today cellphone hacking scandal in great britain consumer privacy as part of the national consciousness. we have a unique opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of millions of americans and the look forward to welcome chairman walton and members of the committees on both challenges. privacy laws are stricter than in the u.s.. how could have gone so far out of hand? whether american consumers are as vulnerable as celebrities in london. i hope chairman genachowski will address this issue as we continue to gather facts. this morning we began an important and some say long overdue debate. how do we have congress and americans balance the need -- >> madam chair, is the microphone on? >> it is. you need to get used to a female chairman. >> how we balance the need to remain innovative with the need to remain privacy. information on sophisticated ways. sometimes the collection and use of this information is extremely beneficial and at times it is not. i am somewhat skeptical of both industry and government. i don't believe industry is doing enough to protect american consumers while
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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